TWELFTH GENERATION
Married Nov 28 1694 in Westerly, RI. (18)


2050. George Babcock was born in 1673 in Westerly, RI.(18) He resided after Dec 31 1706 in S. Kingston, RI. (18) He died on May 1 1756 in S. Kingston, RI. (18) He was also known as George Babcock of Westerly.

From Babcock:
George Babcock's mark for his cattle was recorded in Westerly, May, 1696. In December of the same year he received from his mother a deed of a tract of land in Westerly. Dec. 31, 1706, he resided in Kingston and sold land to his brother James in Westerly. (W.T.R., book i.)

In June, 1707, he was baptized by Elder William Hiscox and united with the S.D.B. Church of Newport and Westerly, R.I., in which church for the rest of his life he was a prominent member, and by his will left a legacy of L300 for his church. A few weeks later, July 20, his wife joined the same church. (S.D.B. Memorial.)

June 28, 1709. he with twenty-six others bought from the Colony of Rhode Island a large tract of land in Kingston and Westerly known as the "Shannock Purchase." His part of the purchase was laid out in Westerly on the south side of Shannock Hill and extended west to the Paweatuck River, in what was afterward Hopkinton and Richmond. His son Hezekiah settled on the part in Hopkinton, and had at least eight hundred acres. His son Elisha settled on the part that was afterward Richmond. In 1715 George Babcock and others assisted in circulating Rhode Island colonial money. See details in records of Capt. James Babcock, a brother of George. He served as Deputy to the Legislature in 1716 and 1721.

He was for many years Justice of the Peace, and was othen called upon to perform marriage ceremonies. He and his wife were buried, upon their own farm in a plot formerly known as the "Babcock Burying Ground." It is about five miles from the Kingston R. R. Station, ans is still used as a cemetary, is inclosed by a neat iron fence. The farm was sold in 1799 by Gideon Babcock, grandson of George and son of David, to Joshua Tucker, and the cemetary is now as the "Tucker Burying Ground." Near by is a body of water formerly known as Babcock's Pond, now called Tucker's Pond. The place was visited in the summer of 1900 by the writer and his brother, Mr. Nathan Babcock of Westerly. The graves of George Babcock and his wife were each covered with slate stone slabs about five and one half feet long by two and one half feet wide and five inches thick, lying horizontal, and on foundations so that they were about one foot from the ground. The leeters were much worn and overgrown with moss, but were finally read.

The two graves are side by side, about three feet apart, and the stones differ only in their insciptions. The writing upon the husband's stone consists of eleven lines, as follows:

IN MEMORY
OF MR. GEORGE BABCOCK,
WHO LIVED A PROFESSOR WITH
THE SEVENTH DAY BAPTIST CHURCH,
AND ALSO HIS WIFE AND EIGHT OF
THEIR CHILDREN WERE MEMBERS
WITH HIM OF THE SAME CHURCH
BOTH IN FAITH AND PRACTICE.
HE DEPARTED THIS LIFE MAY
THE 1ST, A.D. 1756, IN YE 83 YEAR
OF HIS AGE.

A notice of the death of Mrs. Babcock, written from S. Kingston, appeared in the Boston Evening Post two weeks after her death, May 24, 1762. Among other things it states that "She has left 8 children, 61 grandchildren; in all 140 descendants, which whole number live in this colony except one granddaughter, and her children."

A tradition often repeated states that soon after the marriage of George and Elizabeth Hall Babcock he threw a long rope over his dwelling house; he remained at one end of the rope while his wife, Elizabeth went as requested to the other side of the house and tried to pull the rope over, but without success. George called out, "Pull, Betty, pull harder!" Again she struggled, but with no better results than before. George then called for her to come to him; the two, taking hold of the same end of the rope, easily pulled it over the house. The lesson taught was that when husband and wife pull apart no satisfactory results can be reached, but when both pull together everything is easy.

George Babcock by his will, dated Nov. 13, 1750, probated and recorded in S. Kingston, R.I., May 10, 1756, gives away a number of farms, a large amount of personal property, including thousands of pounds in money. To his wife he gave various personal property, including "my negro gall Peg." To his son David he gave the homestead farm, a negro man named "Bristo," a negro woman named "Geney," and appoints David as executor of his will. No reference to his son Jonathan is found in the will. (Will published in appendix.)

2051. Elizabeth Hall was born in 1671 in Westerly, RI. She died on May 8 1762 in S. Kingston, RI.

Children were:

child1025 i.  Mary Babcock (1695-1773)
child George Babcock (1699)
childDavid Babcock (1700)
childJonathon (1702)
childElizabeth (1704)
childAbigail (1706)
childRuth (1709)
childEunice (1712)
child Hezekiah Babcock (1715-1798)
childElisha (1718)

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